Top 10 Endangered Mammals in Nepal

Last updated on 2022-05-26
Top 10 Endangered Mammals in Nepal

Nepal is a biodiversity hotspot for its many ecoregions, which include alpine regions, savannah and grasslands, and coastal environments. There are nine national parks in Nepal, three conservation reserves, three wildlife reserves, four world heritage sites, three Ramsar sites, and one hunting reserve. Nepal has around 208 mammal species. Among these are the top ten endangered animals in Nepal.

*The ranking is based on the data provided by the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation.

10. Bison

Bison
Image Source: lamakarma

The bison (Bos gaurus) is a member of the Artiodactyla Order and the Bovidae Family. It is indigenous to Nepal, India, Myanmar, Thailand, and Malaysia. It may be found in Nepal's Chure bhabar area, Parsa National Park, Chitwan National Park, and Trijuga valley. According to the DNPWC Annual Report (2019), the population is 473. Gaur has a lifetime of 20 to 30 years. The body is gleaming black, the head is light brown, and the lower part of the legs is white. Its height ranges from 1.75 m to 2.2 m, its length ranges from 2.5 m to 3.3 m, and its weight ranges from 1200 kg to 2000 kg. It is listed as a vulnerable species in the IUCN Red List category.

  • Scientific Name : Bos gaurus
  • Total Population in Nepal : 473

9. Red Panda

Red Panda
Image Source: Redpandazine.com

The Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens) is a member of the Carnivora Order and the Ailuridae Family. It is indigenous to Nepal, Sikkim, Myanmar, and South China, among other places. It may be found in the Nepalese national parks of Langtang National Park, Sagarmatha National Park, Kanchanjunga Conservation Area, and Makalu Barun National Park. The red panda population in China is estimated to be 317-582 individuals (Jnawali et al. 2011). The red panda has a 15-year lifetime. It has a spherical head, trapezoidal ears, short legs, and a hairy tail. Its face and lower body are pale in colour, while the remainder of its body is reddish-brown. It has a height of 0.4 m, a length of 0.7 m, a tail length of 0.4 m, and a weight of 3 to 4 kg.

  • Scientific Name : Ailurus fulgens
  • Total Population in Nepal : 450

8. Wild Water Buffalo

Wild Water Buffalo
Image Source: Ntnc.org.np

The Wild Water Buffalo (Bubalus arnee), also known as Arna in Nepali, is a member of the order Aritodactyla's family Bovidae. This species is found in Bhutan, Cambodia, India, Myanmar, Thailand, and Nepal. This species is found in Nepal only in a single, isolated locale (less than 175 km2) in the south-east lowland within the Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve. The global wild water buffalo population is believed to be less than 4000 individuals. According to the DNPWC Annual Report (2019), its population is 441. This species is threatened by genetic degeneration as a result of cross-breeding with domestic buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Similarly, the ongoing threat of extinction in Nepal exists in the event of natural disasters and pandemics.

  • Scientific Name : Bubalus arne
  • Total Population in Nepal : 441

7. Clouded Leopard

Clouded Leopard
Image Source: Vignette.wikia.nocookie.net

The clouded leopard (Pardofelis nebulosa) is a member of the order Carnivora and the family Felidae. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, and Nepal. This species has been reported to occur in the protected areas of Annapurna Conservation Area, Chitwan National Park, Kanchanjunga Conservation Area (skin seized four years ago), Langtang National Park (one casualty recorded in Langtang 10 years ago), Makalu Barun (two pelts were recently recorded from the park's buffer zone), Rara National Park, Shivapuri Nagarjun National Park, and Ghodaghodi Lake Area, as well as the districts of Ilam. Clouded Leopards live in cold, dry and semi-arid shrubland, alpine and subalpine environments, grasslands, and open woodlands, preferring steep terrain with cliffs, ridges, gullies, and rocky outcrops at elevations ranging from 3,000 to 5,500 meters. This species has a worldwide population of roughly 3200 individuals. This species is limited to 300-500 individuals in Nepal.

  • Scientific Name : Neofelis Nebulosa
  • Total Population in Nepal : 400

6. Snow Leopard

Snow Leopard
Image Source: Onlinekhabar.com

The snow leopard (Uncia uncia syn. Panthera Unica) is a member of the order Carnivora and the family Felidae. Snow Leopards are found in seven mountain protected regions in Nepal: Annapurna Conservation Area, Kanchanjunga Conservation Area, Langtang National Park, Makalu Barun National Park, Manaslu Conservation Area, Sagarmatha National Park, and Shey Phoksundo National Park. Snow Leopards live in cold, dry and semi-arid shrubland, alpine and subalpine environments, grasslands, and open woods, preferring steep terrain with cliffs, ridges, gullies, and rocky outcrops at elevations ranging from 3,000 to 5,500 meters. The worldwide population of this species is predicted to be 3921-6290 according to the Snow Leopard Conservation Action Plan (2017-2021). According to the DNPWC Annual Report (2019), its population is projected to be between 301 and 400 people. It is designated as an endangered species by the IUCN red list category owing to decreases caused by Human-Snow Leopard conflict, reduction of natural prey base, habitat loss and fragmentation due to deforestation, and other factors.

  • Scientific Name : Uncia uncia
  • Total Population in Nepal : 350

5. Assamese Monkey

Assamese Monkey
Image Source: Mammalwatching.com

Assamese monkeys generally live at a height of around 600 metres to 1800 metres from sea level and have yellowish-grey to dark-brown fur. Scientists have now started genetic analysis of the Nepali Assamese monkeys. In Nepal, the Assamese monkey is found in Chatara of Koshi region, which is 150 metres above sea level, in Bridim of Rasuwa, which is around 2528 metres above sea level and in Khayokot of Darchula, around 2500 metres above sea level. The total number of Assamese Monkeys in Nepal is now believed to be about 350 individuals.

  • Scientific Name : Macaca assamensis
  • Total Population in Nepal : 350

4. Asian Elephant

Asian Elephant
Image Source: Bardiahomestay.com

The Asian Elephant (Elephas Maximus) is a member of the order Proboscidea and the family Elephantidae. Asian elephants are found across Nepal's Terai area and are predicted to be present in 22 districts. They may be found in the following national parks: Bardia, Chitwan, Koshi Tappu, Parsa, and Shukla Phanta. Prefers mixed, deciduous, and evergreen woodland, as well as thick bamboo, jungle, and grassland. The total number of elephants in Nepal is now believed to be between 255 and 265 individuals (plus 150 domestic Asian Elephants). The world's population is now estimated to be between 30000 and 50000 people. It is classified as endangered by the IUCN red list owing to losses caused by habitat degradation and loss of corridor connectivity.

  • Scientific Name : Elephas maximus
  • Total Population in Nepal : 255

3. Bengal Tiger

Bengal Tiger
Image Source: Therevelator

The Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris Tigris) is a member of the order Carnivora and the Felidae family. The Bengal Tiger most likely arrived in the Indian subcontinent around 12,000 years ago. It may be found in India, Nepal, Bhutan, and Bangladesh. Its populations are dispersed throughout the Terai region, with core subpopulations concentrated in the protected areas of Bardia National Park, Chitwan National Park, Parsa National Park, Banke National Park, and Shukla Phanta National Park, as well as the districts of Banke, Bara, Chitwan, Dang, Kailali, Kanchanpur, Makawanpur, Nawalparasi, Parsa, and Rupandehi. This area was originally a continuous subtropical forest zone, but tigers are now confined to the few surviving patches of appropriate habitat. The majority of tigers live in protected regions, while around a quarter roam freely. This species has a worldwide population of roughly 3200 individuals. According to the DNPWC Annual Report (2019), the population is 235.

  • Scientific Name : Panthera tigris
  • Total Population in Nepal : 235

2. Great Tibetan Sheep

Great Tibetan Sheep
Image Source: blogspot.com

The Great Tibetan Sheep (Ovis ammon hodgsoni), also known as Nayan in Nepali, is a member of the order Artiodactyla's family Bovidae. The species is indigenous to China, India, and Nepal. It is found in the high highlands of Nepal within the Annapurna Conservation Area, to the north of Mustang and Manang district, bordering Tibet. The Argali population in Nepal is unknown. It is, however, likely to be minimal, given just 77 Argali were documented in 2005. The significant drop in population has been attributed to habitat degradation as a result of competition with domestic cattle and human encroachment.

  • Scientific Name : Ovis ammon
  • Total Population in Nepal : 77

1. Grey Wolf

Grey Wolf
Image Source: pinimg

Grey wolves (Canis lupus), also known as Bwasho in Nepali, are members of the order Carnivora and the family Canidae. In the world, it is native to Afghanistan, Albania, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, and many more. It is also native to but likely extinct in Bangladesh and extinct in Ireland, Japan, and the United Kingdom. This species has been found in the Annapurna Conservation Area, Dolpa, Manaslu Conservation Area, Kanchanjunga Conservation Area, and Dhorpatan Hunting Reserve in Nepal. The world population is estimated to be between 200 and 250 million people. It is thought that there may be as few as 30 to 50 people left in Nepal. It is designated as a least concern species on the IUCN red list, however, it is classified as a critically endangered species on the national red list of mammals.

  • Scientific Name : Canis lupus lupus
  • Total Population in Nepal : 40

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10. Bison

Bison
Image Source: lamakarma

The bison (Bos gaurus) is a member of the Artiodactyla Order and the Bovidae Family. It is indigenous to Nepal, India, Myanmar, Thailand, and Malaysia. It may be found in Nepal's Chure bhabar area, Parsa National Park, Chitwan National Park, and Trijuga valley. According to the DNPWC Annual Report (2019), the population is 473. Gaur has a lifetime of 20 to 30 years. The body is gleaming black, the head is light brown, and the lower part of the legs is white. Its height ranges from 1.75 m to 2.2 m, its length ranges from 2.5 m to 3.3 m, and its weight ranges from 1200 kg to 2000 kg. It is listed as a vulnerable species in the IUCN Red List category.

  • Scientific Name : Bos gaurus
  • Total Population in Nepal : 473

9. Red Panda

Red Panda
Image Source: Redpandazine.com

The Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens) is a member of the Carnivora Order and the Ailuridae Family. It is indigenous to Nepal, Sikkim, Myanmar, and South China, among other places. It may be found in the Nepalese national parks of Langtang National Park, Sagarmatha National Park, Kanchanjunga Conservation Area, and Makalu Barun National Park. The red panda population in China is estimated to be 317-582 individuals (Jnawali et al. 2011). The red panda has a 15-year lifetime. It has a spherical head, trapezoidal ears, short legs, and a hairy tail. Its face and lower body are pale in colour, while the remainder of its body is reddish-brown. It has a height of 0.4 m, a length of 0.7 m, a tail length of 0.4 m, and a weight of 3 to 4 kg.

  • Scientific Name : Ailurus fulgens
  • Total Population in Nepal : 450

8. Wild Water Buffalo

Wild Water Buffalo
Image Source: Ntnc.org.np

The Wild Water Buffalo (Bubalus arnee), also known as Arna in Nepali, is a member of the order Aritodactyla's family Bovidae. This species is found in Bhutan, Cambodia, India, Myanmar, Thailand, and Nepal. This species is found in Nepal only in a single, isolated locale (less than 175 km2) in the south-east lowland within the Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve. The global wild water buffalo population is believed to be less than 4000 individuals. According to the DNPWC Annual Report (2019), its population is 441. This species is threatened by genetic degeneration as a result of cross-breeding with domestic buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Similarly, the ongoing threat of extinction in Nepal exists in the event of natural disasters and pandemics.

  • Scientific Name : Bubalus arne
  • Total Population in Nepal : 441

7. Clouded Leopard

Clouded Leopard
Image Source: Vignette.wikia.nocookie.net

The clouded leopard (Pardofelis nebulosa) is a member of the order Carnivora and the family Felidae. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, and Nepal. This species has been reported to occur in the protected areas of Annapurna Conservation Area, Chitwan National Park, Kanchanjunga Conservation Area (skin seized four years ago), Langtang National Park (one casualty recorded in Langtang 10 years ago), Makalu Barun (two pelts were recently recorded from the park's buffer zone), Rara National Park, Shivapuri Nagarjun National Park, and Ghodaghodi Lake Area, as well as the districts of Ilam. Clouded Leopards live in cold, dry and semi-arid shrubland, alpine and subalpine environments, grasslands, and open woodlands, preferring steep terrain with cliffs, ridges, gullies, and rocky outcrops at elevations ranging from 3,000 to 5,500 meters. This species has a worldwide population of roughly 3200 individuals. This species is limited to 300-500 individuals in Nepal.

  • Scientific Name : Neofelis Nebulosa
  • Total Population in Nepal : 400

6. Snow Leopard

Snow Leopard
Image Source: Onlinekhabar.com

The snow leopard (Uncia uncia syn. Panthera Unica) is a member of the order Carnivora and the family Felidae. Snow Leopards are found in seven mountain protected regions in Nepal: Annapurna Conservation Area, Kanchanjunga Conservation Area, Langtang National Park, Makalu Barun National Park, Manaslu Conservation Area, Sagarmatha National Park, and Shey Phoksundo National Park. Snow Leopards live in cold, dry and semi-arid shrubland, alpine and subalpine environments, grasslands, and open woods, preferring steep terrain with cliffs, ridges, gullies, and rocky outcrops at elevations ranging from 3,000 to 5,500 meters. The worldwide population of this species is predicted to be 3921-6290 according to the Snow Leopard Conservation Action Plan (2017-2021). According to the DNPWC Annual Report (2019), its population is projected to be between 301 and 400 people. It is designated as an endangered species by the IUCN red list category owing to decreases caused by Human-Snow Leopard conflict, reduction of natural prey base, habitat loss and fragmentation due to deforestation, and other factors.

  • Scientific Name : Uncia uncia
  • Total Population in Nepal : 350

5. Assamese Monkey

Assamese Monkey
Image Source: Mammalwatching.com

Assamese monkeys generally live at a height of around 600 metres to 1800 metres from sea level and have yellowish-grey to dark-brown fur. Scientists have now started genetic analysis of the Nepali Assamese monkeys. In Nepal, the Assamese monkey is found in Chatara of Koshi region, which is 150 metres above sea level, in Bridim of Rasuwa, which is around 2528 metres above sea level and in Khayokot of Darchula, around 2500 metres above sea level. The total number of Assamese Monkeys in Nepal is now believed to be about 350 individuals.

  • Scientific Name : Macaca assamensis
  • Total Population in Nepal : 350

4. Asian Elephant

Asian Elephant
Image Source: Bardiahomestay.com

The Asian Elephant (Elephas Maximus) is a member of the order Proboscidea and the family Elephantidae. Asian elephants are found across Nepal's Terai area and are predicted to be present in 22 districts. They may be found in the following national parks: Bardia, Chitwan, Koshi Tappu, Parsa, and Shukla Phanta. Prefers mixed, deciduous, and evergreen woodland, as well as thick bamboo, jungle, and grassland. The total number of elephants in Nepal is now believed to be between 255 and 265 individuals (plus 150 domestic Asian Elephants). The world's population is now estimated to be between 30000 and 50000 people. It is classified as endangered by the IUCN red list owing to losses caused by habitat degradation and loss of corridor connectivity.

  • Scientific Name : Elephas maximus
  • Total Population in Nepal : 255

3. Bengal Tiger

Bengal Tiger
Image Source: Therevelator

The Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris Tigris) is a member of the order Carnivora and the Felidae family. The Bengal Tiger most likely arrived in the Indian subcontinent around 12,000 years ago. It may be found in India, Nepal, Bhutan, and Bangladesh. Its populations are dispersed throughout the Terai region, with core subpopulations concentrated in the protected areas of Bardia National Park, Chitwan National Park, Parsa National Park, Banke National Park, and Shukla Phanta National Park, as well as the districts of Banke, Bara, Chitwan, Dang, Kailali, Kanchanpur, Makawanpur, Nawalparasi, Parsa, and Rupandehi. This area was originally a continuous subtropical forest zone, but tigers are now confined to the few surviving patches of appropriate habitat. The majority of tigers live in protected regions, while around a quarter roam freely. This species has a worldwide population of roughly 3200 individuals. According to the DNPWC Annual Report (2019), the population is 235.

  • Scientific Name : Panthera tigris
  • Total Population in Nepal : 235

2. Great Tibetan Sheep

Great Tibetan Sheep
Image Source: blogspot.com

The Great Tibetan Sheep (Ovis ammon hodgsoni), also known as Nayan in Nepali, is a member of the order Artiodactyla's family Bovidae. The species is indigenous to China, India, and Nepal. It is found in the high highlands of Nepal within the Annapurna Conservation Area, to the north of Mustang and Manang district, bordering Tibet. The Argali population in Nepal is unknown. It is, however, likely to be minimal, given just 77 Argali were documented in 2005. The significant drop in population has been attributed to habitat degradation as a result of competition with domestic cattle and human encroachment.

  • Scientific Name : Ovis ammon
  • Total Population in Nepal : 77

1. Grey Wolf

Grey Wolf
Image Source: pinimg

Grey wolves (Canis lupus), also known as Bwasho in Nepali, are members of the order Carnivora and the family Canidae. In the world, it is native to Afghanistan, Albania, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, and many more. It is also native to but likely extinct in Bangladesh and extinct in Ireland, Japan, and the United Kingdom. This species has been found in the Annapurna Conservation Area, Dolpa, Manaslu Conservation Area, Kanchanjunga Conservation Area, and Dhorpatan Hunting Reserve in Nepal. The world population is estimated to be between 200 and 250 million people. It is thought that there may be as few as 30 to 50 people left in Nepal. It is designated as a least concern species on the IUCN red list, however, it is classified as a critically endangered species on the national red list of mammals.

  • Scientific Name : Canis lupus lupus
  • Total Population in Nepal : 40